Sunday Breakfast Menu, Sept. 1

Sunday's Breakfast MenuStephen Crowley/The New York Times

With President Obama’s announcement Saturday that he will seek Congressional approval to strike Syria, the Sunday shows will interview lawmakers about how the United States should respond to the the use of chemical weapons in Syria, previewing the debate ahead.

Senator John McCain, Republican of Arizona and a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, will join CBS’s “Face the Nation.” Mr. McCain, Mr. Obama’s former presidential opponent, has been an outspoken advocate of intervention in Syria.

Also on the program will be Senator Tim Kaine, Democrat of Virginia and another member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, and Senator Saxby Chambliss of Georgia, ranking Republican on the Senate Intelligence Committee.

On NBC’s “Meet the Press,” two members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee — Senator Robert Menendez of New Jersey, who chairs the committee, and Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky — will share their thoughts on Syria.

Senator Jack Reed, Democrat of Rhode Island, and Senator James M. Inhofe, Republican of Oklahoma, are scheduled to weigh in on “Fox News Sunday,” discussing whether there is Congressional support for a strike.

Representative Peter T. King, Republican of New York and a member of the House Intelligence Committee, and Mike Baker, a former Central Intelligence Agency officer, will also join Fox to talk about the latest revelations from Edward J. Snowden.

Representative Eliot Engel of New York, ranking Democrat on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, and Representative Scott Rigell, Republican of Virginia and a member of the House Armed Services Committee, will appear on CNN’s “State of the Union.” Senator Chris Murphy, Democrat of Connecticut, who is hesitant about military intervention in Syria, will also appear on the program.

ABC’s “This Week” will include interviews with Gen. James E. Cartwright, a former vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Vali Nasr, a former senior State Department adviser and dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

In addition to NBC, Mr. Menendez will appear on Univision’s “Al Punto” at 10 a.m. Eastern and Telemundo’s “Enfoque” at noon Eastern. Otto J. Reich, a former ambassador, will also join Telemundo to talk about Syria.

Thomas J. Donohue, president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, will join C-Span’s “Newsmakers” to talk about policy issues including immigration and jobs.

William S. Cohen, former defense secretary, was interviewed about Syria on Bloomberg’s “Political Capital,” which aired Friday with repeats throughout the weekend. Richard L. Trumka, president of the A.F.L.-C.I.O., also appeared on the program to talk about organized labor.

Mary Cheney Criticizes Her Sister on Same-Sex Marriage

Mary Cheney, the younger sister of Liz Cheney, a Wyoming Senate candidate, sharply criticized her sister’s stance on same-sex marriage and urged her own Facebook friends to share the message.

Posting on Facebook on Friday evening, Mary Cheney, who is gay and married her longtime partner last year, wrote: “For the record, I love my sister, but she is dead wrong on the issue of marriage.”

Their father, former Vice President Dick Cheney, supports same-sex marriage, and the younger Cheney echoed some of his language on the issue when she added, “Freedom means freedom for everyone.”

“That means that all families — regardless of how they look or how they are made — all families are entitled to the same rights, privileges and protections as every other,” Mary Cheney wrote.

Earlier Friday, Liz Cheney revealed her position on same-sex marriage, a topic she has kept relatively quiet about since declaring her candidacy in July against incumbent Senator Mike Enzi, Republican of Wyoming.

“I am not pro-gay marriage,” Liz Cheney said in a statement responding to an apparent push poll against her in Wyoming. “I believe the issue of marriage must be decided by the states, and by the people in the states, not by judges and not even by legislators, but by the people themselves.”

That position — deferring to the will of the voters on a state-by-state basis — may represent something of a compromise between total support or opposition. But it did little to placate her sister.

“It’s not something to be decided by a show of hands,” Mary Cheney wrote.

And to emphasize that she was not shying away from drawing attention to her view, Mary Cheney concluded her Facebook post: “Please like and share if you agree.”

In an e-mail, Mary Cheney declined to comment further on her sister’s position, saying she would let her Facebook post speak for itself.

The Cheney family dispute mirrors the broader disagreement among Republicans on same-sex marriage. Less than a decade after George W. Bush and Dick Cheney won re-election in part thanks to conservative enthusiasm over enshrining traditional marriage into law, some in the party believe they are losing voters, particularly younger ones, over an issue on which public opinion has changed rapidly. But other Republicans believe traditional marriage is a pillar of family values, and in some cases are reluctant to abandon their social conservative base on the issue.

Liz Cheney’s stance underlines the degree to which full-throated support for same-sex marriage, even in a libertarian-leaning state like Wyoming, still poses a political risk in a Republican primary.

Mr. Enzi opposes legalizing same-sex marriage.

Bill Clinton to Raise Cash for Democratic Governors

Bill Clinton, who was the governor of Arkansas before moving to the White House, will return to his political roots — and earn a few more chits for his wife’s political future — next month by raising money for the Democratic Governors Association at a high-dollar New York City fund-raiser.

Mr. Clinton is set to headline a $5,000-per-person dinner in Manhattan for the governors association on Sept. 12, according to a person familiar with the planning. The gathering will include Gov. Peter Shumlin of Vermont, the group’s chairman, as well as Terry McAuliffe, a Virginia governor hopeful and Mr. Clinton’s longtime friend. The money raised will go to help elect governors across the country and not just Mr. McAuliffe’s bid this November.

The organization will need the money ahead of next year, when 36 governors’ races will take place. As of the first six months of 2013, the Republican Governors Association had outraised its Democratic counterpart, $23.6 million to $15 million. Both groups can take unlimited amounts of money.

By helping the ranks of governors, Mr. Clinton also earns some more good will for himself and former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, who may run for president again in 2016. The governors are often the most politically powerful Democrats in their states and can, at times, feel underappreciated by Washington politicians. President Obama, for example, has not raised money for the governors association since 2009, a fact that has caused some irritation among the Democratic governors.

Mr. Clinton has always been a fixture on the political fund-raising and campaign circuit and is expected to both raise cash and stump individually for Democratic governors and candidates next year. Mrs. Clinton has begun a series of policy speeches but has been hesitant about plunging back into electoral politics. She is, however, hosting a fund-raiser for Mr. McAuliffe late next month in her Washington home.

Congress Points Out the Cost of War

President Obama may go it alone with a military strike against the Syrian regime, but for the financially struggling Defense Department there will be a price — and skeptics in Congress appear ready to play the money card.

The Pentagon has already absorbed one round of across-the-board spending cuts known as sequestration. Military officials have told Congress that they do not have excess money to carry out a military strike in Syria. And come Jan. 1, the next round of defense cuts will be $20 billion deeper, thanks to a quirk in last January’s “fiscal cliff” budget deal that spared the military some pain.

That means that President Obama will more than likely have to go to Congress to ask for more money, even if — as expected — he does not seek authorization before military engagement. And on Friday, that led to this warning from the office of the House speaker, John A. Boehner of Ohio:

“If the president is going to need a supplemental spending bill, we would caution him to consider how that request would be received if he chooses to act before Congress is satisfied with his plan,” said Brendan Buck, a spokesman for Mr. Boehner. “Buy-in from Congress and the American people is critical if he’s going to act.”

Such a supplemental request could open up the president to bipartisan approbation. But rejecting financing for continuing military operations would be difficult for Congress — and possibly untenable politically.

Still, senior Republicans in the House, facing a rebellion among rank-and-file members who oppose anything that could lead to a new United States war in the Middle East, tried to make clear Friday that Congress’s power of the purse should not be ignored.

“You can’t thumb your nose at members of Congress and then turn around and ask them to pay the bill,” a Republican Congressional leadership aide said.

President Obama Announces Gun Control Actions

Stymied by Congress, President Obama used his executive powers on Thursday to advance his gun control agenda by closing a loophole in the current background check system and barring the reimportation of surplus American military weapons.

Months after failing to push significant gun legislation through the Senate, Mr. Obama announced the actions as part of what the White House said would be a continuing push to keep firearms out of the hands of dangerous people. Gun rights advocates have criticized him as overstepping by trying to use his own authority to curb gun proliferation.

“Even as Congress fails to act on common-sense proposals, like expanding criminal background checks and making gun trafficking a federal crime, the president and vice president remain committed to using all the tools in their power to make progress toward reducing gun violence,” the White House said in a statement.

The two actions were modest in scope. Currently, the White House said, felons can evade background checks by registering a weapon to a trust or corporation. A proposed regulation would require people associated with trusts or corporations to undergo background checks just as if they had bought the firearms as individuals.

The second new policy will deny all requests to bring American military-grade firearms sold overseas back into the United States to private entities except in rare instances like those for museums. Since 2005, the White House said, the government has authorized requests to reimport more than 250,000 such weapons.

App Smart: Streaming for a Good Beat That’s Just to Your Taste

Streaming for a Good Beat That’s Just to Your Taste

Remember the radio? It was the best way to hear new music when I was a boy. My friends and I would listen to the songs that made the weekly charts and we’d talk about the great tracks and the terrible tracks at school the next day.

Spotify’s Android app.

Rhapsody in some places overseas goes under the Napster brand.

SoundCloud, a free app for iOS and Android.

Since then, the music landscape has undergone a sea change. But discovering music in a similar way is still possible via the latest and fast-evolving trend in digital music: streaming.

Perhaps the best-known streaming music app is Spotify. This app lets you listen to any of your favorite tracks at will, and it is also a digital radio that streams new music. Its interface is simple, bordering on spartan: it has a main screen where you control the music you are hearing, and a menu screen that lets you access different sections of the app and adjust settings.

To listen to a track you simply choose “Search” and type the artist’s name or a word from the track’s title. Spotify then lists the results by artist, album and song title. A more interesting way to use the app, however, is to select the “Discover” option. This reveals a long graphics-heavy list containing all sorts of different music.

Some of this will be familiar (right now, my app is telling me “You’ve been listening to a lot of Daft Punk lately” and recommends one of their albums), some of it will be new. These tracks include new releases, and music that is popular or is being listened to by nearby Spotify users.

There’s also a “Radio” option that has “stations” that stream either a particular band’s music, or genres of your choice, from Alternative to Trance. The app has straightforward controls and will show you album art and even band biographies.

Spotify has changed how I listen to music. But while the app is free on iOS, Android and Windows Phone 8, using it may cost you. In the United States, you can listen to the app’s radio stations free, but to listen to specific tracks you’ll have to subscribe for $10 a month.

For a different experience, you might try Rhapsody (which in some places overseas goes under the Napster brand). As in Spotify, you can search for music you want to hear, or discover new music through a few different routes. For example, the Browse section breaks music into genres; inside each genre’s page you can choose from new releases or popular tracks.

Alternatively, you can find new music through Rhapsody’s home page, which offers access to featured music, new releases and popular tracks. There are also Playlists, which are a little like Spotify’s stations. These lists have a regularly updated selection of music that will stream to you. There are extras like album reviews, so you can learn more about the artist you’re listening to.

Rhapsody’s interface is graphically richer and feels easier to navigate than Spotify’s, thanks to features like its ever-present icon bar. Bu you may find that Rhapsody’s graphics and many settings get in the way of your listening experience. It’s free to download on iOS, Android and Windows Phone 8, but you’ll have to pay $10 a month for unlimited music streaming.

Last.fm was one of the first players that streamed music over the Internet, and now it’s available as an app. Instead of concentrating on giving you access to new music, a bit like traditional radio, Last.fm tries to recommend new music based on the tracks you already listen to. In fact, it monitors music that you play through your mobile device, and keeps a list of it in your profile — a trick it calls “scrobbling.”

The scrobbled list can be shared online and is used to recommend lists of music similar to the kind you already like. The data comes from other Last.fm users’ lists. Last.fm is powerful and entertaining, but its interface is more basic than its peers’ and it doesn’t quite have the same range of music discovery options. And, though the app is free on iOS, Android and Windows Phone 8, to listen to the recommended lists you have to pay $3 a month.

Finally, there’s SoundCloud, a free app for iOS and Android that offers a different kind of streaming music. Where Spotify is like having radio on your phone, SoundCloud is more about hearing new music shared by indie artists via a social network. It has a wonderfully simple interface and it’s fun to use — you can upload your own music and share that too. Just don’t expect to find mainstream rock bands on this app.

Hopefully, you’ll find tons of new music to listen to via these apps, but remember there are other options. The Pandora app is well known and definitely worth trying. Apple is also poised to introduce iTunes Radio — a free service with advertisements. Streaming music is a fast-changing scene, so it’s worth keeping an eye out for special offers.

Quick Call

Telenav Scout, a successful GPS navigation app that’s done well on Android and iOS, has finally hit Windows Phone 8 devices. The core app is free, but advanced features like red light alerts will cost you $25 a year.

Nintendo to Offer Lower-Cost Game Device

Nintendo to Offer Lower-Cost Game Device

The Nintendo 2DS is capable of running all the games made for the 3DS, but without 3-D effects.

SAN FRANCISCO — Nintendo’s portable video-game device, the 3DS, is selling well. But a plan to court children has the Japanese company cutting prices.

Nintendo on Wednesday introduced a new portable gaming system, the Nintendo 2DS. The device will cost $130, or about $40 less than its 3DS sibling, when it is released Oct. 12. It is capable of running all the games made for the 3DS, but without 3-D effects.

For Nintendo, the price drop is a hedge against a future filled with tablet computers made by companies like Apple, Samsung and Amazon.

The growing popularity of tablets among adults means children are increasingly exposed to tablets at an early age. Indeed, about one-third of American adults own tablets. But that figure rises to about 50 percent when counting parents with children living at home, according to Pew Internet Research. And games are routinely played on those tablets, making a dedicated gaming device less appealing.

“Forty bucks may not be a lot, but for families it’s a lot,” said Reggie Fils-Aime, president of Nintendo of America, in an interview. Mr. Fils-Aime said the 2DS was intended for the “entry gamer,” especially in families with multiple children.

Also on Wednesday, Nintendo said it would reduce the price of its console for the living room, the Wii U, by $50, amid disappointing sales. The new price will be $300.

The gaming market has expanded over the last several years thanks in part to smartphones and tablets. The new devices have attracted what analysts call casual gamers — the people who yank out their smartphones and tablets to play games a few minutes on the commute to work, or the toddlers who play Angry Birds at family dinners.

Despite all that competition, Nintendo’s portable gaming device has been doing well.

The 3DS has been the best-selling piece of gaming hardware over the past three months, according to NPD Group. The last, best-selling portable gaming device was the Nintendo DS; with over 150 million units sold, it has become the best-selling portable gaming device in history.

With the addition of the 2DS, Nintendo now offers three portable devices, including the 3DS and the larger 3DS XL.

Tablets are considered a threat to Nintendo because games can be downloaded for a few dollars, or even free. In addition, Nintendo’s strategy has been to make most of its money off sales of the games it produces exclusively for Nintendo devices. Therefore, it has refused to offer its games to makers of tablets and smartphones.

That means famous titles native to Nintendo, like Super Mario or Donkey Kong, could be left to earlier generations. And that’s bad news for the Japanese company.

“The longer that they abstain from those platforms, the longer they risk failing to acquaint children with that stable of characters,” said Ross Rubin, an independent technology analyst for Reticle Research. “Since there is virtually no presence on these screens that kids are starting to increasingly spend more and more time with, Nintendo is going to have to work harder to gain exposure to that audience.”

Mr. Rubin said there were several ways for Nintendo to participate in the mobile market outside of selling games for its own devices — without cannibalizing its own business. The company could offer software that complements its games and systems, like iPad apps that turn the tablet into an extra controller for the 3DS or Wii U. Nintendo could also create lightweight versions of its games for tablets and phones, using them to promote the superior versions of the games available only for Nintendo systems, he said.

For the moment, however, cost-cutting appears to be Nintendo’s answer.

“All we’re doing is making available a device that, for consumers who want a lower price point but want to play all these great games, now you have the opportunity,” Mr. Fils-Aime said. “And we think it’s going to work.”

State of the Art: A Better Way for the iPad to Talk to a Home Computer

A Better Way for the iPad to Talk to a Home Computer

90 Seconds With Pogue: Parallels Access: The Times’s David Pogue reviews at Parallels Access, an iPad app that allows a user to remotely control a desktop or laptop computer.

You don’t have to be a technophile to know a few things about compatibility. VHS tapes don’t play on a laptop, iPhone apps don’t run on your microwave and a CD won’t play in a toaster.

Most people probably assume you also can’t use Mac or Windows programs on an iPad. The iPad, the world’s most popular tablet, runs its own flavor of software.

Which is a shame, really. All kinds of programs would be useful to have on your lovely, lightweight tablet: Quicken. Photoshop. iTunes. The full-blown Word, Excel, PowerPoint. AutoCAD.

I’m pleased to report that such a thing is possible, thanks to a remarkable new app, Parallels Access. Parallels, the company, has a good deal of experience running incompatible programs on popular computers; its best-known product lets you run Windows on a Mac.

Access is not some miracle adapter that runs Mac and PC programs on the iPad itself. Instead, it’s a glorified porthole into the screen of a real Mac or PC back at your home or office. You see everything on your distant computer remotely; you can even click, type and drag in the programs there, even listen to audio and watch videos. The iPad becomes like a detached touch screen for a Mac or PC that’s thousands of miles away.

It’s not just about running desktop software, either. This setup also means you can access the far greater storage and horsepower of your computer. And you can work with files you left behind. The one catch: It requires an Internet connection. Access works over slower connections — like 3G cellular — but barely. You may encounter severe lags and blotchiness.

To make this come to pass, you set up Access on both ends. You install one app on your iPad, and another on your Mac or PC (Mac OS X 10.8 or later, Windows 7 or later). You also create a free account at Parallels.com.

From now on, whenever you want to operate your Mac or PC by remote control, you open the Access app on the iPad. You tap the picture of the computer whose brain you want to enter; there’s nothing to stop you from setting up two, or 12, or hundreds of Macs and Windows machines to listen for the iPad’s call.

When you first connect, you see a launcher: an iPad-style screen full of icons. In this case, they represent your Mac or PC programs. Tap one to open it. This launchpad starts out showing only the icons of your most frequently used Mac or Windows programs, but you can tap a “+” button to add other icons.

Parallels Access is not the first product that lets you access your Mac or PC remotely. There are many iPad apps that do that, bearing names like VNC Viewer and Real VNC. They cost $10 or $20. Corporate tech workers adore them. From wherever they happen to be, they can see, operate and troubleshoot the computer back at headquarters from the screen of a single iPad, without having to put on pants and drive to the office.

But Parallels Access is superior, for many reasons.

First, VNC apps are extremely technical to set up. Here’s an excerpt from the dozens of setup steps for Real VNC, one of the best reviewed apps: “By default, VNC Server listens on port 5900. You can listen on a new port, providing no other service or program is doing so. Note you will have to specify the new port when connecting, and you may need to reconfigure firewalls and routers.” O.K. then!

Parallels Access requires no fiddling with routers, firewalls or port numbers. You fill in your Parallels name and password, and boom: the connection is made, with 256-bit AES encryption (translation: “very securely”).

Second, VNC apps display the entire computer’s screen on the iPad. Icons, toolbars and buttons wind up about the size of subatomic particles.

Access, on the other hand, “appifies” the Mac or Windows program; the document you’re editing fills the screen. All the iPad touch-screen gestures work to operate the remote program, too — drag with one finger to scroll, for example. Tap to “click the mouse.” Tap with two fingers to “right-click.” Pinch or spread two fingers to zoom out or in. No matter what the Mac or PC program is, it suddenly behaves as if it is an iPad app.

Access is filled with additional touches that VNC-type programs generally lack, which further adapt mouse-and-keyboard software to a touch screen.

E-mail: pogue@nytimes.com

Nintendo to Offer Lower-Cost Game Device

Nintendo to Offer Lower-Cost Game Device

The Nintendo 2DS is capable of running all the games made for the 3DS, but without 3-D effects.

SAN FRANCISCO — Nintendo’s portable video-game device, the 3DS, is selling well. But a plan to court children has the Japanese company cutting prices.

Nintendo on Wednesday introduced a new portable gaming system, the Nintendo 2DS. The device will cost $130, or about $40 less than its 3DS sibling, when it is released Oct. 12. It is capable of running all the games made for the 3DS, but without 3-D effects.

For Nintendo, the price drop is a hedge against a future filled with tablet computers made by companies like Apple, Samsung and Amazon.

The growing popularity of tablets among adults means children are increasingly exposed to tablets at an early age. Indeed, about one-third of American adults own tablets. But that figure rises to about 50 percent when counting parents with children living at home, according to Pew Internet Research. And games are routinely played on those tablets, making a dedicated gaming device less appealing.

“Forty bucks may not be a lot, but for families it’s a lot,” said Reggie Fils-Aime, president of Nintendo of America, in an interview. Mr. Fils-Aime said the 2DS was intended for the “entry gamer,” especially in families with multiple children.

Also on Wednesday, Nintendo said it would reduce the price of its console for the living room, the Wii U, by $50, amid disappointing sales. The new price will be $300.

The gaming market has expanded over the last several years thanks in part to smartphones and tablets. The new devices have attracted what analysts call casual gamers — the people who yank out their smartphones and tablets to play games a few minutes on the commute to work, or the toddlers who play Angry Birds at family dinners.

Despite all that competition, Nintendo’s portable gaming device has been doing well.

The 3DS has been the best-selling piece of gaming hardware over the past three months, according to NPD Group. The last, best-selling portable gaming device was the Nintendo DS; with over 150 million units sold, it has become the best-selling portable gaming device in history.

With the addition of the 2DS, Nintendo now offers three portable devices, including the 3DS and the larger 3DS XL.

Tablets are considered a threat to Nintendo because games can be downloaded for a few dollars, or even free. In addition, Nintendo’s strategy has been to make most of its money off sales of the games it produces exclusively for Nintendo devices. Therefore, it has refused to offer its games to makers of tablets and smartphones.

That means famous titles native to Nintendo, like Super Mario or Donkey Kong, could be left to earlier generations. And that’s bad news for the Japanese company.

“The longer that they abstain from those platforms, the longer they risk failing to acquaint children with that stable of characters,” said Ross Rubin, an independent technology analyst for Reticle Research. “Since there is virtually no presence on these screens that kids are starting to increasingly spend more and more time with, Nintendo is going to have to work harder to gain exposure to that audience.”

Mr. Rubin said there were several ways for Nintendo to participate in the mobile market outside of selling games for its own devices — without cannibalizing its own business. The company could offer software that complements its games and systems, like iPad apps that turn the tablet into an extra controller for the 3DS or Wii U. Nintendo could also create lightweight versions of its games for tablets and phones, using them to promote the superior versions of the games available only for Nintendo systems, he said.

For the moment, however, cost-cutting appears to be Nintendo’s answer.

“All we’re doing is making available a device that, for consumers who want a lower price point but want to play all these great games, now you have the opportunity,” Mr. Fils-Aime said. “And we think it’s going to work.”