The Teensy Audio Library

teensy3_audio There are a few ways of playing .WAV files with a microcontroller, but other than that, doing any sort of serious audio processing has required a significantly beefier processor. This isn’t the case anymore: [Paul Stoffregen] has just released his Teensy Audio Library, a library for the ARM Cortex M4 found in the Teensy 3 that does WAV playback and recording, synthesis, analysis, effects, filtering, mixing, and internal signal routing in CD quality audio.

This is an impressive bit of code, made possible only because of the ARM Cortex M4 DSP instructions found in the Teensy 3.1. It won’t run on an 8-bit micro, or even the Cortex M3-based Arduino Due. This is a project meant for the Teensy, although [Paul] has open sourced everything and put it up on Github. There’s also a neat little audio adapter board for the Teensy 3 with a microSD card holder, a 1/8″ jack, and a connector for a microphone.

In addition to audio recording and playback, there’s also a great FFT object that will split your audio spectrum into 512 bins, updated at 86Hz. If you want a sound reactive LED project, there ‘ya go. There’s also a fair bit of synthesis functions for sine, saw, triangle, square, pulse, and arbitrary waveforms, a few effects functions for chorus, flanging, envelope filters, and a GUI audio system design tool that will output code directly to the Arduino IDE for uploading to the Teensy.

It’s really an incredible amount of work, and with the number of features that went into this, we can easily see the quality of homebrew musical instruments increasing drastically over the next few months. This thing has DIY Akai MPC/Monome, psuedo-analog synth, or portable effects box written all over it.

Filed under: ARM, digital audio hacks

The Teensy Audio Library

teensy3_audio There are a few ways of playing .WAV files with a microcontroller, but other than that, doing any sort of serious audio processing has required a significantly beefier processor. This isn’t the case anymore: [Paul Stoffregen] has just released his Teensy Audio Library, a library for the ARM Cortex M4 found in the Teensy 3 that does WAV playback and recording, synthesis, analysis, effects, filtering, mixing, and internal signal routing in CD quality audio.

This is an impressive bit of code, made possible only because of the ARM Cortex M4 DSP instructions found in the Teensy 3.1. It won’t run on an 8-bit micro, or even the Cortex M3-based Arduino Due. This is a project meant for the Teensy, although [Paul] has open sourced everything and put it up on Github. There’s also a neat little audio adapter board for the Teensy 3 with a microSD card holder, a 1/8″ jack, and a connector for a microphone.

In addition to audio recording and playback, there’s also a great FFT object that will split your audio spectrum into 512 bins, updated at 86Hz. If you want a sound reactive LED project, there ‘ya go. There’s also a fair bit of synthesis functions for sine, saw, triangle, square, pulse, and arbitrary waveforms, a few effects functions for chorus, flanging, envelope filters, and a GUI audio system design tool that will output code directly to the Arduino IDE for uploading to the Teensy.

It’s really an incredible amount of work, and with the number of features that went into this, we can easily see the quality of homebrew musical instruments increasing drastically over the next few months. This thing has DIY Akai MPC/Monome, psuedo-analog synth, or portable effects box written all over it.

Filed under: ARM, digital audio hacks

Retrotechtacular: The First Atlas Launch

atlas on baseAs the Cold War conflict expanded in the 1950s, the Soviet Union dry-tested a hydrogen bomb and defense tactics became a top priority for the United States. Seeking to create a long-range nuclear missile option, the Air Force contracted Convair Astronautics to deliver SM-65 Atlas, the first in series of ICBMs. In the spotlight this week is a sort of video progress report which shows the first launch from Cape Canaveral’s LC-14 on June 11, 1957.

After the angle of attack probe is unsheathed, everyone moves out of the way. The launch is being monitored by base central control, but the swingin’ spot to spectate is the blockhouse. They have a periscope and everything. As the countdown continues, liquid oxygen pipelines whistle and wail into the idyllic Florida afternoon with the urgency of a thousand teakettles. Cameras and tracking equipment are readied, and the blockhouse’s blast door is sealed up tight.

trackerAround T-3 minutes, it’s time to run down the go/no-go checklist in the blockhouse. It is at this point that we find out this launch was under a 10-hour countdown, which has gone exactly as planned. Some top-secret things are bleeped out on the soundtrack, but we are allowed to know the objectives of this test, which are to prove the basic elements. These include the durability of the airframe, the launching mechanics, autopilot fallback, propulsion, and overall flight stability. There’s another checklist at the two-minute warning, and the angle is set to [redacted]. At long last, it’s time to launch the [redacted] thing.

launchedAtlas launched successfully and was stable for a little while. Shortly after launch, one engine failed and then another. Because of this, the Range Safety Officer remotely destroyed it. Debris fell all over the base and in the sea, but most of the major components were recovered for their precious data. All in all, many things went well or at least satisfactorily, and the Convair Astronautics division of General Dynamics didn’t lose their contract.

Atlas models were only in the ICBM business for a short time. Most notably, they launched the first American astronauts into orbit and enjoyed a long, illustrious career launching satellites.

Retrotechtacular is a weekly column featuring hacks, technology, and kitsch from ages of yore. Help keep it fresh by sending in your ideas for future installments.

[Thanks for sending this in, James. Happy Space Week!]

Filed under: Retrotechtacular

Retrotechtacular: The First Atlas Launch

atlas on baseAs the Cold War conflict expanded in the 1950s, the Soviet Union dry-tested a hydrogen bomb and defense tactics became a top priority for the United States. Seeking to create a long-range nuclear missile option, the Air Force contracted Convair Astronautics to deliver SM-65 Atlas, the first in series of ICBMs. In the spotlight this week is a sort of video progress report which shows the first launch from Cape Canaveral’s LC-14 on June 11, 1957.

After the angle of attack probe is unsheathed, everyone moves out of the way. The launch is being monitored by base central control, but the swingin’ spot to spectate is the blockhouse. They have a periscope and everything. As the countdown continues, liquid oxygen pipelines whistle and wail into the idyllic Florida afternoon with the urgency of a thousand teakettles. Cameras and tracking equipment are readied, and the blockhouse’s blast door is sealed up tight.

trackerAround T-3 minutes, it’s time to run down the go/no-go checklist in the blockhouse. It is at this point that we find out this launch was under a 10-hour countdown, which has gone exactly as planned. Some top-secret things are bleeped out on the soundtrack, but we are allowed to know the objectives of this test, which are to prove the basic elements. These include the durability of the airframe, the launching mechanics, autopilot fallback, propulsion, and overall flight stability. There’s another checklist at the two-minute warning, and the angle is set to [redacted]. At long last, it’s time to launch the [redacted] thing.

launchedAtlas launched successfully and was stable for a little while. Shortly after launch, one engine failed and then another. Because of this, the Range Safety Officer remotely destroyed it. Debris fell all over the base and in the sea, but most of the major components were recovered for their precious data. All in all, many things went well or at least satisfactorily, and the Convair Astronautics division of General Dynamics didn’t lose their contract.

Atlas models were only in the ICBM business for a short time. Most notably, they launched the first American astronauts into orbit and enjoyed a long, illustrious career launching satellites.

Retrotechtacular is a weekly column featuring hacks, technology, and kitsch from ages of yore. Help keep it fresh by sending in your ideas for future installments.

[Thanks for sending this in, James. Happy Space Week!]

Filed under: Retrotechtacular

Mobile security player Good Technology takes $80M ahead of IPO

Mobile security player Good Technology takes $80M ahead of IPO

Good Technology, a company that helps big businesses let their employees use mobile devices securely, has taken on $80 million before its upcoming IPO.

In announcing the new funding today, Good didn’t say who was putting up the money. It only said Oppenheimer & Co. was handling the book-running.

In May, Good filed to go public.

Good’s products include mobile-device management, identity and access management, and mobile analytics, among other services. Good said today that more than 5,000 organization use its technology. The company started in 1996 and is based in Sunnyvale, Calif.

Good Technology provides multi-platform enterprise mobility, security and management software. Product offerings include those Good for Enterprise, Good for Government, Good for OEM Device Manufacturers/Carriers and Good Dynamics, the … read more »



Mobile security player Good Technology takes $80M ahead of IPO

Mobile security player Good Technology takes $80M ahead of IPO

Good Technology, a company that helps big businesses let their employees use mobile devices securely, has taken on $80 million before its upcoming IPO.

In announcing the new funding today, Good didn’t say who was putting up the money. It only said Oppenheimer & Co. was handling the book-running.

In May, Good filed to go public.

Good’s products include mobile-device management, identity and access management, and mobile analytics, among other services. Good said today that more than 5,000 organization use its technology. The company started in 1996 and is based in Sunnyvale, Calif.

Good Technology provides multi-platform enterprise mobility, security and management software. Product offerings include those Good for Enterprise, Good for Government, Good for OEM Device Manufacturers/Carriers and Good Dynamics, the … read more »



Reddit CEO on new $50M round, ‘selling out,’ an

Reddit CEO on new $50M round, ‘selling out,’ and putting his own money at stake (interview)
Image Credit: nComment

With the news that Reddit just closed a new $50 million funding round, lots of people are asking what this means for the popular community-sharing site.

Since launching in 2005, Reddit has proven that it and its community has staying power. It’s also demonstrated that it won’t sacrifice or anger that community for the profit’s sake. But what Reddit hasn’t had, until now, is the money to transform into a viable business alongside the likes of Facebook, Google, and Twitter.

CEO Yishan Wong, however, attempted to put things
into perspective — as well as assure those diehard Reddit users that the $50 million in the bank won’t change the site’s core values. He’s so confident that he’s putting his own money into it; Wong is among the handful of entrepreneurs that participated in the large funding round.

“I decided it was necessary to participate myself to show that I believe in the company and what we’re doing,” Wong told VentureBeat today via e-mail. Additionally, he agreed to answer some bigger questions about the investment.

VentureBeat: Why raise new funding now? Why not two or three years ago?

Yishan Wong: We actually did back then; it was just quiet and no one seemed to care. You don’t want to raise money until a company can invest it properly, and we are at that state now.

VentureBeat: What was compelling about the crop of entrepreneurs also participating in the round?
Specifically, Yishan, why did you feel compelled to drop money into this round?

Wong: We looked for investors and entrepreneurs who understood Reddit and our philosophy and aims. I decided it was necessary to participate myself to show that I believe in the company and what we’re doing.

VentureBeat: What would you say to the people who claim Reddit is “selling out” by taking new investment?

Yishan Wong

Above: Reddit CEO Yishan Wong poses for a verification photo.

Wong: When you take investment, you don’t, can’t, just ride off into the sunset with the money. It’s not the same as selling your business
and taking a payout. It’s an investment, intended to be used to make the site better and more useful for all the users, which is our plan.

VentureBeat: Can you give me a bit more of an explanation about the “10 percent of shares back to the community” plan? Who will own those shares? A collection of individuals? Has this been done before by other companies? How much, percentage-wise, will the community’s stake in Reddit be?

Wong: We’re working through the details. We don’t believe any other company has done this before.​

VentureBeat: How would you respond to criticism that Reddit only spoke up about banning “The Fappening” because it was so close to announcing the new funding round? Certainly Reddit has dealt with uncomfortable issues like
this plenty of times in the past, such as the banning of the subreddits Creepshots, Jailbait, and the moderator that was managing both. Why do you think this time was different? Or was it?

Wong: Well, the two just aren’t related. Fundraising cycles are much longer than nude celebrity-photo cycles, and the two happened to overlap. We handled the two independently, just like we made statements around other events. If anything, I spoke with our investors before doing the final term sheet signing and told them “Hey, this thing is going on, and we are going to handle it the way we always handle things. Here’s a chance to back out if you want,” and they all stayed in. It was a nice chance to make sure they were really on board with how we do things.

If there’s any confusion: [Reddit] did not shut down /r/TheFappening due to content linking to
nude celebrity photos. The subreddit was shut down because users were reposting content already taken down due to valid DMCA requests, and because spammers began posting links to the images hosted on their own pay-per-click sites, or sites intended to spread malware. Both activities violate our rules and we took down the subreddit for those reasons only. Similar subreddits created immediately afterwards were also removed for similar reasons, some were created by the spammers themselves.

We understand that this was confusing because our clarification around this stance was posted at around the same time that activity in the subreddit began to violate the rules we’ve detailed here (and thus triggering a shutdown), so we hope this makes things clear.

VentureBeat: Why has it suddenly become “cool” among some tech people to hate Reddit? Do you have a rough estimated guess on how long it’ll take to become “cool” to
hate the Reddit haters? Or how long it’ll take for Reddit to become universally loved, like Bill Murray?

Wong: Sites involving very large numbers of users end up being very complex, so there are waves of good PR and bad PR, affected by a lot of micro events in unpredictable ways. I experienced this at Facebook, and it sort of comes and goes. We just focus on making the site good for users, because that’s the underlying reality.

reddit was founded by Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian in 2005, and is an online community where users submit, vote, and comment on content, stories, and discussions. The hottest stories as determined by the community through discussio… read more »



Reddit CEO on new $50M round, ‘selling out,’ an

Reddit CEO on new $50M round, ‘selling out,’ and putting his own money at stake (interview)
Image Credit: nComment

With the news that Reddit just closed a new $50 million funding round, lots of people are asking what this means for the popular community-sharing site.

Since launching in 2005, Reddit has proven that it and its community has staying power. It’s also demonstrated that it won’t sacrifice or anger that community for the profit’s sake. But what Reddit hasn’t had, until now, is the money to transform into a viable business alongside the likes of Facebook, Google, and Twitter.

CEO Yishan Wong, however, attempted to put things
into perspective — as well as assure those diehard Reddit users that the $50 million in the bank won’t change the site’s core values. He’s so confident that he’s putting his own money into it; Wong is among the handful of entrepreneurs that participated in the large funding round.

“I decided it was necessary to participate myself to show that I believe in the company and what we’re doing,” Wong told VentureBeat today via e-mail. Additionally, he agreed to answer some bigger questions about the investment.

VentureBeat: Why raise new funding now? Why not two or three years ago?

Yishan Wong: We actually did back then; it was just quiet and no one seemed to care. You don’t want to raise money until a company can invest it properly, and we are at that state now.

VentureBeat: What was compelling about the crop of entrepreneurs also participating in the round?
Specifically, Yishan, why did you feel compelled to drop money into this round?

Wong: We looked for investors and entrepreneurs who understood Reddit and our philosophy and aims. I decided it was necessary to participate myself to show that I believe in the company and what we’re doing.

VentureBeat: What would you say to the people who claim Reddit is “selling out” by taking new investment?

Yishan Wong

Above: Reddit CEO Yishan Wong poses for a verification photo.

Wong: When you take investment, you don’t, can’t, just ride off into the sunset with the money. It’s not the same as selling your business
and taking a payout. It’s an investment, intended to be used to make the site better and more useful for all the users, which is our plan.

VentureBeat: Can you give me a bit more of an explanation about the “10 percent of shares back to the community” plan? Who will own those shares? A collection of individuals? Has this been done before by other companies? How much, percentage-wise, will the community’s stake in Reddit be?

Wong: We’re working through the details. We don’t believe any other company has done this before.​

VentureBeat: How would you respond to criticism that Reddit only spoke up about banning “The Fappening” because it was so close to announcing the new funding round? Certainly Reddit has dealt with uncomfortable issues like
this plenty of times in the past, such as the banning of the subreddits Creepshots, Jailbait, and the moderator that was managing both. Why do you think this time was different? Or was it?

Wong: Well, the two just aren’t related. Fundraising cycles are much longer than nude celebrity-photo cycles, and the two happened to overlap. We handled the two independently, just like we made statements around other events. If anything, I spoke with our investors before doing the final term sheet signing and told them “Hey, this thing is going on, and we are going to handle it the way we always handle things. Here’s a chance to back out if you want,” and they all stayed in. It was a nice chance to make sure they were really on board with how we do things.

If there’s any confusion: [Reddit] did not shut down /r/TheFappening due to content linking to
nude celebrity photos. The subreddit was shut down because users were reposting content already taken down due to valid DMCA requests, and because spammers began posting links to the images hosted on their own pay-per-click sites, or sites intended to spread malware. Both activities violate our rules and we took down the subreddit for those reasons only. Similar subreddits created immediately afterwards were also removed for similar reasons, some were created by the spammers themselves.

We understand that this was confusing because our clarification around this stance was posted at around the same time that activity in the subreddit began to violate the rules we’ve detailed here (and thus triggering a shutdown), so we hope this makes things clear.

VentureBeat: Why has it suddenly become “cool” among some tech people to hate Reddit? Do you have a rough estimated guess on how long it’ll take to become “cool” to
hate the Reddit haters? Or how long it’ll take for Reddit to become universally loved, like Bill Murray?

Wong: Sites involving very large numbers of users end up being very complex, so there are waves of good PR and bad PR, affected by a lot of micro events in unpredictable ways. I experienced this at Facebook, and it sort of comes and goes. We just focus on making the site good for users, because that’s the underlying reality.

reddit was founded by Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian in 2005, and is an online community where users submit, vote, and comment on content, stories, and discussions. The hottest stories as determined by the community through discussio… read more »



Here’s why top economists unanimously agree the governm

Here’s why top economists unanimously agree the government should stop regulating Uber (in 1 graph)

Economists generally disagree about nearly everything, as the famous University of Chicago poll of America’s top economists finds. It typically sees wide variation in opinion on everything from net neutrality to airline mergers.

When asked whether the government and
taxi unions should stop interfering with ride-sharing services, every single one agreed that Uber, Lyft and their competitors should be let free. Specifically, the economists were asked if the government should let “car services such as Uber or Lyft compete with taxi firms on equal footing regarding genuine safety and insurance requirements, but without restrictions on prices or routes, raises consumer welfare.”

56 percent strongly agreed and 37 percent agreed. Although three respondents did not answer, no one was undecided.

“Yes. yes. A thousand times yes. Instead, try calling for a cab on Saturday night from the south side of Chicago and see what happens,” wrote Austan Goolsbee, former chairman of Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers.

Recent studies seem to back up the economist poll. One study from
Berkeley found that Uber was far more efficient at picking up passengers; 92 percent arrive in under 10 minutes, compared to 16 percent of taxis. Another study from MIT found that 95 percent of all taxi trips in some areas of New York City could be shared. Both Lyft and Uber are now offering carpooling options, which could significantly decrease the number of cars on the road.

Governments around the world disagree. California threatened to shut down Uber and Lyft’s carpool service. German courts have gone back and forth over bans on ridesharing. The most recent move, as of yesterday, is to have Uber use regular German taxi drivers in their service. Belgium has essentially banned ridesharing apps.

With both the public and consumers fighting for less regulation, it’s unknown how long governments can continue their trend in heavy-handed strictures.

Readers can see the full poll results here.


VentureBeat is studying the state of marketing technology. Chime in, and we’ll share the data.



Here’s why top economists unanimously agree the governm

Here’s why top economists unanimously agree the government should stop regulating Uber (in 1 graph)

Economists generally disagree about nearly everything, as the famous University of Chicago poll of America’s top economists finds. It typically sees wide variation in opinion on everything from net neutrality to airline mergers.

When asked whether the government and
taxi unions should stop interfering with ride-sharing services, every single one agreed that Uber, Lyft and their competitors should be let free. Specifically, the economists were asked if the government should let “car services such as Uber or Lyft compete with taxi firms on equal footing regarding genuine safety and insurance requirements, but without restrictions on prices or routes, raises consumer welfare.”

56 percent strongly agreed and 37 percent agreed. Although three respondents did not answer, no one was undecided.

“Yes. yes. A thousand times yes. Instead, try calling for a cab on Saturday night from the south side of Chicago and see what happens,” wrote Austan Goolsbee, former chairman of Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers.

Recent studies seem to back up the economist poll. One study from
Berkeley found that Uber was far more efficient at picking up passengers; 92 percent arrive in under 10 minutes, compared to 16 percent of taxis. Another study from MIT found that 95 percent of all taxi trips in some areas of New York City could be shared. Both Lyft and Uber are now offering carpooling options, which could significantly decrease the number of cars on the road.

Governments around the world disagree. California threatened to shut down Uber and Lyft’s carpool service. German courts have gone back and forth over bans on ridesharing. The most recent move, as of yesterday, is to have Uber use regular German taxi drivers in their service. Belgium has essentially banned ridesharing apps.

With both the public and consumers fighting for less regulation, it’s unknown how long governments can continue their trend in heavy-handed strictures.

Readers can see the full poll results here.


VentureBeat is studying the state of marketing technology. Chime in, and we’ll share the data.